AOF:191 Defining health, bleeding veggie burgers, branding, and healthy plant based food of course.

Matt Frazier founded No Meat Athlete as a blog to follow his own journey and since has grown it into a loyal and respected brand! He previews his newest project, a cookbook with all plant based menu items.

  • We talk about the potential controversy with plant based products that are meant to feel and taste like real meat and in some instances even bleed.
  • We talk a bit about the Keto diet fad
  • Branding his business
  • We even dive into a couple recipes you can whip up anytime!

More Amazing Athletes

AOF:220 Jesse Itzler on raising adventurous kids, an Everest challenge, and his journey.

Jesse Itzler is a serial entrepreneur, ultra runner, and general seeker of adventure. On the show we talk about: Adventurous parenting Addiction to newness, Mental toughness. Business and entrepreneurial ambitions. The Cryathlon- an event he is organizing that sound BRUTAL! 29zero29– His event that pushes you to gain the height of Everest in a weekend […]

Read More

AOF:219 Grizzly bears, biking adventure, and a calling found in the mountains.

Our guest is as passionate about the outdoors as anyone we have had on the show. We talk about his calling and many of the adventures that have come along with it. Of his personal achievements, he completed an 1800 mile bikepack from Banff, Canada to his home in Colorado. From day to day, you […]

Read More

AOF:218 From Mobility WOD HQ, functional training for adaptive athletes.

Max Conserva is back on the show to share a new training protocol he helped develop for coaches and trainers to work better with adaptive athletes.  Before reading anymore be sure to check out the program here. So many trainers simply pass off the opportunity to work with athletes with prosthetics or other obstacles when […]

Read More

AOF:217 Former Olympian finding better ways to deal with injuries with technology.

Ian Warner is a serial entrepreneur, former collegiate and Olympic athlete, and now, a father and husband.  We talk about the idea he has had for year that he finally made happen and the friend he lost that inspires him everyday to keep going.   We talk about failures along the way that give us […]

Read More

AOF:173 The guy behind Obstacle Racing Media.

This is one of those shows where you realize, there are people out there with similar lifestyles.  A passion for his business, hustle, and raising a family between it all.  Yep, we get that here at Athlete On Fire.

 

  • Learn how Obstacle Racing Media got started
  • What Matt is putting a lot of time in from a media standpoint
  • The physical skills more obstacle racers need to focus on to be more successful out there.
  • Who inspires him
  • What a typical day looks like

More from Athlete On Fire

AOF:220 Jesse Itzler on raising adventurous kids, an Everest challenge, and his journey.

Jesse Itzler is a serial entrepreneur, ultra runner, and general seeker of adventure. On the show we talk about: Adventurous parenting Addiction to newness, Mental toughness. Business and entrepreneurial ambitions. The Cryathlon- an event he is organizing that sound BRUTAL! 29zero29– His event that pushes you to gain the height of Everest in a weekend […]

Read More

AOF:219 Grizzly bears, biking adventure, and a calling found in the mountains.

Our guest is as passionate about the outdoors as anyone we have had on the show. We talk about his calling and many of the adventures that have come along with it. Of his personal achievements, he completed an 1800 mile bikepack from Banff, Canada to his home in Colorado. From day to day, you […]

Read More

AOF:218 From Mobility WOD HQ, functional training for adaptive athletes.

Max Conserva is back on the show to share a new training protocol he helped develop for coaches and trainers to work better with adaptive athletes.  Before reading anymore be sure to check out the program here. So many trainers simply pass off the opportunity to work with athletes with prosthetics or other obstacles when […]

Read More

AOF:217 Former Olympian finding better ways to deal with injuries with technology.

Ian Warner is a serial entrepreneur, former collegiate and Olympic athlete, and now, a father and husband.  We talk about the idea he has had for year that he finally made happen and the friend he lost that inspires him everyday to keep going.   We talk about failures along the way that give us […]

Read More

Winning the rough days

Goodness. It’s been a while! Things have been shifting over the past month and a half for me! This year, April brought exams, two unexpected injuries, and (after 5 years in London, Ontario) the reality of packing up my life into two big suitcases and moving home (permanently?) to Alberta! It’s both scary and exciting knowing that I won’t be returning to London in the fall, but rather, I’ll be embarking on a new adventure… as a Master’s student at the University of Alberta. (What?!?!)

 

Though I’m so ridiculously fortunate to have a fantastic family and job to return to, I always struggle a little bit when I move home — many of my friends from high school aren’t around anymore, so my summers are typically filled with work, running, and family. It’s honestly so wonderful, but it’s definitely a change of pace! During the school year I like to keep my schedule packed, but when I come home, things slow right down. For the past few summers, running has kept me busy after work, provided an outlet for me to release my extra energy, and given me something to focus on.

 

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My family is the bomb. I’m a hardcore fangirl of my fellow Frissell’s. <3

 

But this year, things are a little different. I’m struggling with a few injuries and adapting to some new stresses. It’s been a real mental challenge not being able to run lately — since that’s my usual release, I’ve got some pent up energy and stress!

 
So to help ward off negativity and frustration, I’ve identified a small list of daily personal goals that, when achieved, keep me feeling my best. These are the tiny things I need to check off each day in order to feel good — when I feel good, I’m more motivated, optimistic, joyful, focused, and more likely to make the choices I know are right for me!

 

 
In order to feel good each day, I need to

 

  1. Connect with nature — for me, this might be as simple as a 10 minute walk or watching a rainstorm from our deck. I just need to feel an intentional connection with the natural, outside world.
  2. Take care of my body — this might mean using it and/or resting it. Whether I’m sitting on the couch icing my leg, heading out for a tough workout, or doing some focused breathing before bed, I feel good engaging with and taking care of my body (and indirectly, my mind).
  3. Go to bed a little bit hungry — this one’s pretty specific, but I sleep noticeably better and wake up feeling much more energized when I go to bed with a bit of an empty stomach!
  4. Connect with family/friends — I’m a notorious over-thinker, so it’s crucial for me to get out of my head and connect with people I care about.

 

 

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I get to connect with nature every day at the cemetery. Two years ago I was fortunate enough to meet this little angel, Margo!

 

Super simple tasks, but they make a massive difference in my mental state! Perhaps your list looks similar, or maybe there’s no overlap. I challenge you to notice what your ‘feel good’ list is made up of, and write it down. Even if you’re injured, travelling, sick, or if your day just doesn’t go quite as planned, you can fall back on these simple things and turn even the roughest day into a win.

STSS 6: Leptin — The Satiety Hormone

 

Leptin is a neat little hormone that tells us when we’ve had enough to eat.

If there’s a hormone for this, why do we often tend to overeat?

Note: While this video focuses on leptin, other players (ie: hormones like orexin and ghrelin) also influence appetite. It’s important to remember that the body is incredibly complex, and there are always a number of factors at play!


It should also be noted that the general process discussed in this video is not as instantaneous as I make it out to be! The amount of leptin released is directly proportional to the amount of body fat that an individual has — and that body fat does not increase instantaneously when you eat 3 mini eggs. On the whole, an individual with more body fat will have higher levels of leptin in their circulation than an individual with less body fat. 

 

When in doubt move….more than your body.

We have all been there.  Doubt creeps in.  Should I be here?  Doing this?
Have I wasted the last 5 years, months, weeks, hours doing this thing?  There are so many others doing it so well already, why should I even try.
 
It could be for a sport, a business, or a relationship.  The thought that we have invested time that we will never get back is scary.  This singular thought has paralyzed us often.  And it’s funny.  The fear of losing time to a thing causes us to freeze up and inevitably lose more of that time.
 
This website and podcast has created that doubt more than once.  Actually, more than 20 times.  Daily sometimes.  The passion that this thing that was created from the heart doesn’t fade but the confidence that it will turn into my vision does. It happens with runners.  It happens with athletes from every sport.  The doubt at the free throw line.  The lost confidence in a hitter in a slump.
 
Businesses change and pivot and figure it out. So do athletes.
 
Every day I wake up I know of 5 things that could make Athlete On Fire better.  The resources and media, the angles I haven’t taken yet. Marketing in certain ways.  I’ve been handcuffed from the fear of NOT failure.  It’s the fear of success.  This post will address this fear from this point on in less words than you have already read.  The fear of failure isn’t the thing.  The fear of SUCCESS is rooted in the subconscious.
 
Really think.   The fear of success might look like some of these thoughts, buried deep.

The Fear Of:

  • Being different(or seeming different) than family and friends you’ve been connected to forever.
  • The attention you just aren’t comfortable with for doing something great.
  • The work that comes with success.  Once you have something successful, it needs your attention.
  • Knowing you’ll have to lead, you have to lead as you grow.
  • Getting comfortable with the work. If you haven’t made it, it’s probably because the work hasn’t been done yet.

Here is the fix.

Move.

Write an article.

Sharing your thoughts on how to make it helps yourself and hopefully, others.

Do that thing that scares the hell out of you.

Sign up for a race.

Produce some videos.  The things in your gut you’ve wanted to do every day that you KNOW will help. Do them.

And do the small things.

They build your confidence by building a base of skill and character. Then again, you can just do what you have always done, settle in and be ordinary.  You ALWAYS have a choice.

 


When not trying to get others to move, Scott is moving with his young family, ideally in the mountains.

When not trying to get others to move, Scott is moving with his young family, ideally in the mountains.

Scott founded Athlete On Fire and knows a thing or two about getting people to move. With over 12,000 training sessions under his belt with people from all walks you get to see the fear of success and failure. This piece was an observation as much as a self reflection everyone should go through occasionally.

Picking Your Truths

Maybe you have a goal that you’re totally psyched about — you’re inspired, super focused, and it’s on your mind all the time. That’s fantastic! It’s a satisfying and productive headspace to be in.

 

But, maybe that’s not the case for you right now. Maybe you’re at a low point, and, although you had this big goal (whether in sport, academia, career, [life] etc), you’ve gotten a little off track, made a few mistakes, or simply lost your drive. For whatever reason, you’re doubting yourself.

 

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Right now, you’re not sure if you can do that big scary thing you want to do.
This isn’t a fun place to be, and it can be hard to come out of.

 

But here’s the cool thing I’ve realized:
You get to pick your truths.

 

The other day, Dr. Jessica Grahn gave a presentation at Western about bias. There is bias all around us. These biases come from our surroundings and they perpetuate our own self doubt. Often, these biases/doubts are subconscious — they’re so ingrained in our psyche, that we don’t even realize that they’re guiding our thoughts and dictating our actions. For example: when I think of a successful person, the image that pops into my head is a well-groomed, well-dressed, white male. I’m not alone in this (just Google search images of ‘successful person’ and this will become clear), and it’s not a choice I’ve consciously made. Twenty-three years of living in the Western world have made this choice for me. That’s just one example.

 

A bias is based on something we perceive, so it is not false, but it’s also not necessarily true. Recognize this. We’re empowerful when we can recognize our own biases. When we recognize our biases, we can locate the origin our self doubts and see that these doubts are based on information that is neither true nor false (for example, even though I picture the aforementioned man as the figurehead of ‘success,’ it does not mean that I can’t be successful, and it does not mean that you, regardless of gender, race, knowledge, etc can’t be successful).

 

Then the best part: we get to pick what we want to be true (ie: I can be successful; I can be strong; I can be fast; I can be creative; I can be intelligent. Better yet: I am successful).

 

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Since nothing is truly true in this world (everything is coloured by perception), we pick our own truths. Often, we choose to go with the bias because it’s our knee-jerk reaction. But remember that there is always another option. We get to pick what we believe and which thoughts we nurture.


The thoughts we nurture and the stories we tell ourselves are the truest truths out there because they dictate whether or not we persevere; we have to choose which thoughts to nurture because those are the ones that will bloom. We have to be aware of our own biases so that we don’t limit ourselves (or others).

 

So if you’re doubting yourself, question your bias, and pick a new truth.
You are good enough.
You can do that thing you want to do.
You can be that thing you want to be.

 

 

Challenge: Notice negative self-talk and stop it in its tracks! Pick a new truth. Choose to believe that you can do that terrifying, exciting, wonderful thing. Perception is the only thing that’s stopping you. Change your lens. Welcome your fears, acknowledge their origin, embrace them… but then set them to the side, get excited, and dive into your new truth.

 

STSS 4: VO2 Max

 

“If I breathe deeper and faster, I’m using more oxygen, right?”

 

Wellllll….

Have You Ever Been Hangry?

I certainly have. If I don’t get food when I need it, it can be a rough time for the people around me! Food and nutrition are so interesting to me — the idea that we have to constantly consume in order to function; the fact that our bodies are made of what we put into them; the fact that this necessary ‘chore’ is an enjoyable, often social event — it’s all just so wonderful, strange, and fascinating to me.

 

Anywho, I love food.
But… I’m writing this on a Wednesday, and today (and tomorrow, and Friday morning) I can’t have any food!


Let me first say that I am not dieting. I’m participating in a 6-week protein requirement study for endurance athletes. Leading up to the study, we took measurements of my weight, height, body composition, VO2 max, and resting metabolic rate. Then the study itself began!

 

The study only affects me 3 days of the week: Wednesday and Thursday (‘Adaptation Days’) as well as Friday (‘Test Day’). My diet on the adaptation days is based on my individual needs and is 100% controlled.

 

Like I said, I can’t eat… so what am I consuming?
Well, my diet on Wednesdays and Thursdays is 100% liquid.

 

I’m given a number of milkshake-type meal replacements based on my caloric needs (which factor in the amount of training I typically do on those days), as well as additional fibre, glucose, protein, and a multivitamin. I can drink as much water as I want, and I can have black coffee and/or tea. MMMMM!

 

(Note: when I say diet, I’m simply referring to what I’m putting into my body — this is not a “diet to lose/gain weight. The adaptation days simply prepare my body for the test day.)


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The first Wednesday morning! It’s basically bacon and eggs.

I was excited to start the study! As much as I love food, I like experimenting with nutrition to see how different foods/diets affect my body.

 

I will admit, I was also a little nervous going in. I’ve tried liquid diets before. One summer, my dad and I did a 10 day juicing challenge to see how we’d feel. I remember how I felt.
I. Felt. Hangry.
I specifically remember returning home from work on the 5th day, beyond grumpy, and promptly making myself a sandwich.

 

So you can imagine my hint of hesitation going into this study. Will I be hungry? Will I be hangry? Certainly I’ll have cravings. What if I can’t do it? It’s only 2.5 days a week for 6 weeks. I can do that… right? 

 

 
As it turns out, I didn’t have to worry! Although I’m only taking in liquids, my body’s caloric and nutritional needs are being met. I don’t have cravings, and I’m genuinely not hungry. It feels a little strange not having meals (I just sip consistently throughout the day) and not taking in solid food, but I actually feel incredible.

 

While I eat quite healthy on normal days, I found out that I’m actually not eating enough of what my body needs. I can feel the difference in my energy during the adaptation days — I feel light, happy, and healthy. I’ve noticed a few other things too. Situations that would normally frustrate or annoy me don’t seem to bother me as much. My mind is sharper and I listen more intently. I spent last Thursday night at a friend’s house making adorable Valentine’s cookies, and (although I would have liked to have tried one), I had no problem just cutting out the hearts. (You have to know… this isn’t normal for me! When I make cookies, I’m typically one to eat half the batter and then some of the finished product. But I was completely content with my shake!)

 

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Pretty cute, right?

 

I’m not suggesting we all switch to liquid diets. Definitely, definitely not! Food is fun, and it can do so much for our bodies! This study is really helping to remind me of the difference it makes when I make the choice to give my body what it needs.

 

Challenge: Think about your diet this week! Are you getting what you need? Do you know what you need? It can be so confusing! Maybe you’ll decide to do some research, try a new cookbook, experiment with lentils, introduce more water into your diet, or put some time into prepping balanced meals. Try making small changes and pay attention to how they make you feel! 

 

Happy Eating!

When Was The Last Time You Did Something For The First Time?

University life is pretty wonderful. As a student, I have access to so many free and low-cost resources that aren’t necessarily easy to come by outside of the university bubble. Health services, academic counselling, career workshops, and the occasional free midnight breakfast during exam season are a few of these perks.

 

Throughout my undergrad, I’ve also had the opportunity to meet and hear the stories of so many inspiring people. This past Tuesday, Clara Hughes visited Western’s campus — an event that was free for all students and faculty to attend.

 

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For those of you who don’t know who Clara Hughes is, here’s the quick version:

 

Clara is a Canadian athlete who has won 6 Olympic medals:

 

Two in the Summer Olympics for cycling, and four in the Winter Olympics for speed skating.
(I know, I know… you’re fan-girling aren’t you? Excelling at just one thing is extraordinary enough!)

 

But Clara’s story is so much bigger than her athletic achievements. Speaking openly about her struggles with depression and disordered eating, Clara is the spokesperson for the Bell Let’s Talk campaign — a Canadian campaign that aims to shift mental health conversations to a state in which they’re comfortable, common, and stigma-free. Clara is also an Athlete Ambassador for Right To Play, and a member of RTP’s International Board of Directors.

 

Image from: http://www.righttoplay.ca/Learn/keyplayers/Pages/Athlete-Ambassadors.aspx?ItemId=420

Image from: http://www.righttoplay.ca/Learn/keyplayers/Pages/Athlete-Ambassadors.aspx?ItemId=420

 

I don’t know about you, but I sometimes catch myself subscribing to the notion that elite athletes have it all together. My Instagram feed is filled with incredible snapshots of incredible athletes doing incredible things, day in, day out. Their lives as I know them through TV screens, Instagram filters and other social media channels are entirely focused on and dedicated to their craft. From my couch, it’s easy to forget that these people are, in fact, people, and (like you and me) they are not immune to pressure, stress, illness, insecurity, masochism, injury, and self-doubt.

 

Image from: http://www.canada.com/olympics/news/canadas-olympians-not-exempt-from-depression-and-anxiety-even-with-success

 

While Clara’s book Open Heart, Open Mind, does share the triumphs of her athletic career, more importantly, it provides insight into what was really going on off the screen and inside Clara’s head throughout her career. (If you haven’t read the book, I can’t recommend it enough. Plus, all the money raised by the book goes straight to charities like Right To Play and Take a Hike!)

 

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Anywho… back to the event. The Q&A portion of the event was small and intimate — we all cozied up in a circle and Clara took off her microphone. After reading her book, I had so many questions for her, but I opted for one that had been running through my mind consistently. In Open Heart, Open Mind, Clara wrote that

 

“… as a pro athlete… narcissism was defined as ‘commitment.’ It became an invisible cloak I was encouraged to wear.”
I think there’s a fine line here for anyone that’s trying to pursue something at a high level — athletic or otherwise. Whatever your passion, it takes time, energy, and focus to become your own version of ‘great.’ For example, as athletes, we need sleep, proper fuel, and time for both workouts and recovery. Where is the balance between healthy commitment and unhealthy narcissism? How can we remain committed to continuous improvement without becoming self-absorbed?

 

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Image from: http://canadiens.nhl.com/club/news.htm?id=639196

 

I don’t know what I was expecting Clara to say — maybe something about meditation, consciously grounding ourselves, or not taking ourselves too seriously — all of which make sense in theory, but aren’t entirely tangible and are much easier said than done.

 

Her advice was not what I was expecting. It was simple and practical. If you want to maintain your humanity, try something new. Get outside of your comfort zone —  your daily grind — and try something new: something difficult; something that will kick your butt; something that will remind you of your own humanity, and will bring lightness and perspective into your life. Humble yourself. For Clara, this was achieved through hiking the Appalachian Trail, but for you or me it might be through rock climbing, learning how to oil paint, or taking up yoga.

 

Simple, yes, but a great reminder to keep ourselves human. There comes a point where we might begin to treat ourselves as machines, forgetting that variety is, indeed, the spice of life!

 

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Challenge: You already know… This week, try something new! Recognize that joy can be found in places that you haven’t looked yet. In the process, be kind and light with yourself — remind yourself that you are human — you are not defined by your sport or your ‘skill;’ you are more.
Earth is a big place. Go explore! 

SISU:RADIO:11 From special forces to OCR.

Originally from Nuremberg, Germany, Fabian left home when he was 17 to join the German Army Special Forces as a Supporter in their Operations Center and Training & Testing Center for about two years. A decade later he moved to California and now lives in San Jose, where he work as IT Security Analyst.

Among other events, he’s completed more than a dozen Goruck events, two of them 24hr Heavies, and two Spartan HH12HR events. Coming from a strong endurance base, he switched to speed in 2015 and managed to work his way up through the ranks in Spartan Race and finished the last race in the Top 10 of the Elites.

He shares his experiences and perspectives on Flow Not Force and compete on NBC’s “Spartan: The Ultimate Team Challenge”, which will air within the next few months.

One of the more quiet, and horribly underrated endurance athletes in the scene today, SISU catches up with Fabian to talk about how he trains, his plans and accents that aren’t American.

LISTEN

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