62 Miles: Grateful Suffering

I get these ideas.  You do too, I’m sure, but when it sits there banging around in my head the only thing I can do is go for it.  Yeah, it probably drives my wife crazy occasionally but she is kind of the same way so it usually works.  So, when I told her I had to run 62 miles on my dad’s first birthday after passing, she just said “of course.”   She knew it would be therapeutic, and it was.
 
The course was made up by mapping a few of my dad’s favorite spots in the state of West Virginia, pretty close to where he and my mom retired.  Spruce Knob, the highest point in the state is where we would begin running 13 miles down a newly paved road at 3 am.  It used to be a dirt road which our quads would have appreciated. We dropped about 3000 feet on that first half marathon.

 

Then we would climb up a country road behind Seneca Rocks on the North Fork Mountain trail.  To get to the trail was a 1800′ climb over 5 miles.  We would fuel up and head to the 26 ish mile, zero access trail for the toughest part of the run.  It was slow going but really pretty, minus the roots and rocks of course!
 
We got to the end around mile 45 and met some family, got some water from the spring, and hopped in the river to clean up a bit.  Then for the last 17.  3 flat, 7 straight up, 7 flat (ish).  We finished in the Dolly Sods wilderness under the stars late at night with friends and family to celebrate his birthday.  Shannon, my sis made this video to capture parts of the experience.
 
Have an idea that is personal and physical?  Let me know and I’d be happy to give some advice on how to make it happen. It’s what I do!
 

Moving into the great unknown of 2018, one thing is certain.

I started Athlete On Fire fours year ago.  Holy crap, that seems amazing.  Often, I had no idea what I was doing. Other times, no idea why I was doing.  The effort for creating media and content to try and help strangers from who knows where is a real thing.  It’s redundant.  Reach out, record, edit, post, write copy, post, repeat….blah.  That junk is boring as hell the second I hang up with a guest after a call.

Then, dangit, one of you well meaning people from some small village outside of London, or on the southern coast of Australia, or in the middle of Kansas gets the gumption, the nerve, to send an email telling me how the show made a difference.  You were injured and the stories kept you motivated.  You didn’t think you could do the “thing” but you went out and did the thing anyway.  That junk is fuel. Big time.  And though I could add up the hours and the dollar bills I spend on this to make a case for my sanity, or insanity, I won’t.  I love this.

I love moving and getting you to move with the purest and strongest intention on being a better version of yourself.  That is the one certain thing of 2018.

Oh, there is another.  I am turning 40 years old this year.  What?  You for real?

YEP.

They used to call being over 40 “over the hill.”  That’s freakin dumb man. I have some crazy physical goals this year.

I’ll share the ones I remember right now:

  • Dunk on a regulation hoop.  I’ve had this goal for my 40th birthday for as long as I can remember. I am coming off training for and running my first 100k so my fast twitch efforts are freaking brutal right now.  But, I have to make this happen.  Just a simple little dunk.
  • I want to run 50 miles in a foreign country.  More to come on this.  Planning July.
  • Float the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon.  Booked. With my uncle, my dad’s brother.  We float then hike out!!!
  • Throw a football 50 yards.  Same thing as the dunk. I’ve always had this goal.
  • Bodyfat under 10% . This is the only metric I will even check this year.  I don’t care what my weight is or any other BS. I want to move well, be strong, and feel great.
  • Hit a baseball over a regular sized field.  This is a weird one because I haven’t hit a ball in years.
  • Run a sub 6:00 mile.
  • Run a sub 20 5k.
  • Do 100 push ups straight through.
  • Do 20 pull ups without stopping.

Those are some of the main ones.  Also, I want to make fitness and training as fun as you can imagine.  Challenges and new training ideas coming to you early and often and with a little trash talk. Come hang here.  You’ll either step up or curl up and start rolling over your own hill.

Leggo 2018!

Cover Photo by: Shannon Gray

Adventure doesn’t have to be big

Adventure.  Everyone wants more but has no idea where to get it.  We know it’s good for our heart and soul.  And sometimes our legs and lungs.  Yet, it seems, less and less of us are adventuring.

 

Adventure is a huge part of our make up.  We as a human race traveled across mountain ranges just to see what was on the other side.  Risking life and the lives of the ones we love.

 

We hopped on rickety boats and sailed across the world.  We climbed mountains without supplemental oxygen, technical gear, or a stairmaster to train on.

 

So, we know it’s a part of what makes us human.  And yes, people are still going on amazing adventures.  We share their stories on podcasts like the Athlete On Fire show and Instagram feeds are inundated with tons of adventurers sharing their views and their thoughts on their experiences.

 

But, for every modern traveler with 80 thousand followers, how many of us are out there doing our thing?  Finding our adventure?  I don’t know.  But let’s at least make it easier to justify.

 

Adventure doesn’t have to be BIG.  I mean, it can be, but then you may just wait until everything is perfect and that’s just silly.  The best adventures are the ones that are not even close to perfect. A bad day in the woods is a much better memory than an uneventful one.

 

Some ways to think about what an adventure is today:

1. It’s something other people aren’t willing to do.

Going for a run at midnight or 4am in the morning in and of itself is an adventure.  Your senses are heightened. The same route you’d take in the middle of the day is completely different.  Just change one variable of a typical thing and it becomes adventurous.

2. Be willing to go somewhere different (MICRO).

This is a quite literal way of thinking of adventure.

You know what, hundreds of people climb Everest every year.

Thousands visit Machu Picchu.

That little grassy knoll on the side of the road 3 miles from your house though, probably noone has been up there in decades.  Find small ways to go places others aren’t going.

 

A friend and I were up in South Dakota recently.  We didn’t feel like driving to a trail head so we geared up and headed out the lodge and across the street.  We ducked into the woods and started climbing.  Snow fields and brush and downed trees.  We kept hiking and freaking ended up at the top of a ski resort.  Unique, unknown, and adventurous for sure.

3. Be willing to go somewhere different, to you.

So you live in the country, go visit the nearest city and go for a run. Hit up the stairwells of the biggest hotel.  New places are invigorating even if they are a few miles aways.  Same for you city dwellers.  Find dirt, play in it.

4. Get uncomfortable.

Raining out, hit the streets. Snowstorm coming?  Bundle up and get out there.  Being uncomfortable changes the stimulus.  Changed stimulus helps us take the world in in a different way.

 

Now, can you start thinking of adventure differently?  We have hundreds of ideas, and we’ll share more but for now get out there and adventure a little more.

 

Have fun adventure ideas?  Let us know in the comments!


 

The author is the host and founder of Athlete On Fire.  Every once in awhile, he blogs about real stuff and adventures as much as he possibly can in his home state, Colorado.
 Like the idea of training for adventure, check out some of our free Workouts for Adventures.

The case against beautiful things.

You know the term “This is why we can’t have nice things.”

Well, this is why we can’t have beautiful things. Anymore.

 

First, beautiful– Of beauty, magnificence, or representing an abstract feeling of good, of love.  Both natural and supernatural.  Both literal and figurative. Almost always subjective.

 

 

Athletes find beauty in effort. In victory and in hindsight, DEFEAT.

 

Runners on a trail eye to eye with a deer or overwhelmed by the sunrise off the canyons or the dew or through their breath.

 

Some think a baby crying for the first time is beautiful.  Nope;)  But, the first time they lock eyes, for sure.  Call you daddy, hell yeah!

 

Are weddings beautiful?  Sometimes. But more beautiful is hot food in a messy kitchen at 10pm when you walk in the door for the millionth time.

 

 

 

Is       death                            beautiful?

 

Unfortunately, kind of.

 

But then. Nothing is ever beautiful again.

 

When I lost my dad last fall I felt nothing but love, and sadness.  Never angry.  And a little time has passed and I get pissed here and there.  You know what really pisses me off though?

 

The beautiful things

 

The sunset

 

                        music that moves and my sons and

 

the trails

 

and the clouds from the airplane and my wife.

 

The early mornings and movies and you know what?

 

 

I can see BEAUTY in everything. I think I always have but damn…

 

                                                              It all sucks.

 

I hate the way it feels and the way it doesn’t make people feel.  I especially hate the way it doesn’t make other people feel.

 

 

And I hate that he isn’t here to share it all.  Or is he?

 

I’ve never noticed so much beauty in my life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you find beauty too.

 


 

The author is the host and founder of Athlete On Fire.  Every once in awhile, he blogs about real stuff and the thoughts that come quickest. He is also writing this p.s.!

 

Athlete Profiles: 003 “Until I found OCR, I was a bit lost and bored with life.”

Athlete (and we are all athletes) Profiles:

Check out more details about why we do this and even submit your profile HERE.



Name:

Stephen Geppert

 

DOB:

11/14/1972

 

Location:

Columbia, SC

 

What is the best thing about your hometown?

Blue Crabs! (My hometown is Baltimore, MD although I’ve lived in so many different places I don’t really have a true hometown). .

 

Athletic history:

I “accidentally” started running when I was 7 years old because I wanted to do the same fun run my 14 year old brother was doing. It’s kind of a funny story, because my parents thought I was missing until they found me sitting on the curb at the finish line waiting for my brother to catch up so we could cross the line together. After that, I didn’t run again until middle school where I ran track and cross country through high school. I also played baseball until I was 13, when I felt pressure to choose between baseball and running track. I played a lot of intramural sports in college but decided not to run competitively in order to focus on school. After that, I was in and out of fitness. When I was 33, I decided to learn how to play soccer and played in a rec league for several years. It was a humbling and extremely rewarding experience.

 

Current athletic passion:

When I turned 40, I did a local mud run (Project Mud) in Charleston, SC. It didn’t seem too bad, so I signed up for a Spartan Race the following April. I ran the first mile at 5K pace and then failed three obstacles in a row. Needless to say, I got crushed and barely finished! Since then, I’ve been hooked and have been getting a little bit better each year. I was fortunate enough to qualify for and run in this year’s OCR World Championships and recently qualified to run it again in 2017. That was a truly amazing experience.

 

Who or what in the world is inspiring you right now?

Prior to starting with OCR, I was 30 lbs heavier and drank way too often (mostly out of boredom). After three years of mostly focusing on the fitness side of things, I recently completed the 90 day OYNB challenge (mentioned in one of your podcasts). What is inspiring me now is how good I feel both physically and mentally as I’ve gone through this journey and how much better I am as a parent, husband, and business professional.

 

What is your favorite single workout or physical challenge that people can try today?

Aside from trail running, my favorite is to find a local playground with monkey bars and a football goal post. You can do traditional monkey bars, lateral monkey bars, Tyrolean ladders, and pull ups on the monkey bars and Tyrolean traverse, overhead beam traverse, and lateral beam traverses on the goal posts. I usually run back and forth between the monkey bars and goal posts between sets. I also live near a state park, so I like to run through the park and hit all of the nearby playgrounds, trees, etc. to do the same exercises during the run. It’s basically like creating your own obstacle course race in training.

 

Why do you consider yourself an athlete on fire?

When it comes to athletics, I’ve always been pretty competitive, so I have always thought of myself as an athlete. (Even when I was 30 lbs heavier and not taking care of myself, I still had the mental image of myself as an athlete). I am also a bit of an introvert, which I think makes it easy for me to go to an event and stay in that competitive athletic mindset because I find it hard to socialize. That being said, one of the things that I unexpectedly love about the OCR community is the completely welcoming atmosphere shared by everyone who participates, from the super-fit elite racers to the less fit first timers who have never done an event before. I have literally never seen anyone make fun of another person at one of these events, and I believe that if someone did, they would be immediately called out and probably shamed off of the course. Everyone is constantly encouraging everyone else. I think this community truly embodies the notion that everyone is an Athlete, regardless of their physical ability or appearance. If you are on the starting line, you are an athlete. It is very common to see people stopping to share food or help someone else who is struggling. I know I have become a lot more social at these events over the years, and now I always bring extra food to share during a race just in case someone needs it. I would never had thought to do that three years ago when I started.

 

What would you say to someone who hasn’t found their passion in sport or life yet?

Keep looking! You don’t know what you don’t know until you do, so just try as many new things as you can until you find what connects with you. It’s out there somewhere.

Until I found OCR, I was a bit lost and bored with life. Now I wake up every day with a purpose beyond the daily routine. It has driven me to make better positive choices and to try to be a better person in all aspects of my life. It just makes everything better overall.

 

Where are you on your athletic journey? Flicker, Flame, or Fire?

Fire

 

What keeps you up at night?

Getting injured! I have learned a great deal in the past three years about how NOT to train and what NOT to do nutritionally. I ran incorrectly, I ate incorrectly, and I trained incorrectly. As a result, I’ve had IT band syndrome, heat exhaustion, dehydration, “bonking”, and this year a broken 5th metatarsal in my right foot. I am now an avid podcast listener and have completely changed my entire training program based on what I’ve learned. We’ll see how this year goes with my newfound knowledge!

 

What’s your favorite healthy recipe that anyone can try today?

I am not a big cook, so I go for simplicity. One of my favorites is grilled chicken in a small soft taco shell with chopped cilantro and white onions, a pinch of lime, and La Victoria Salsa Brava hot sauce. It is super easy and really good!

 

NOTE FOR Stephen:Thank you so much for sharing part of your story with the Athlete On Fire community. Thanks for sharing the awesome workouts and attitude!  OCR is such a great sport. You are inspiring us as much as we are you! You are definitely an inspiring Athlete On Fire!  

 

Remember. I am, you are, everyone is an athlete on fire!

Listen to some inspiring athletes here!

AOF:218 From Mobility WOD HQ, functional training for adaptive athletes.

Max Conserva is back on the show to share a new training protocol he helped develop for coaches and trainers to work better with adaptive athletes.  Before reading anymore be sure to check out the program here. So many trainers simply pass off the opportunity to work with athletes with prosthetics or other obstacles when […]

Read More

AOF:217 Former Olympian finding better ways to deal with injuries with technology.

Ian Warner is a serial entrepreneur, former collegiate and Olympic athlete, and now, a father and husband.  We talk about the idea he has had for year that he finally made happen and the friend he lost that inspires him everyday to keep going.   We talk about failures along the way that give us […]

Read More

AOF: 216 Nike trail runner Chris Mocko.

Chris Mocko is a Boulder, Colorado based runner. We talk about his transition to Colorado from the Bay Area, his favorite trails, his training, and lots about real life stuff.   This episode is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special life insurance rates.  Go to healthiq.com/aof to support the show […]

Read More

AOF:214 Clare Gallagher on coral reefs, travel, running, and her true passions.

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face. She studied coral ecology and ran cross country and track at Princeton. After graduation, she discovered ultra running while teaching English in Northern Thailand. Clare lives in her home state of Colorado when she’s not on the road.   Our conversation went all over into her […]

Read More

Athlete Profiles: 002 “In retrospect, I should have been a runner that also played baseball.”

Athlete (and we are all athletes) Profiles:

Check out more details about why we do this and even submit your profile HERE.



Name:

Brian DePersis

 

DOB:

1/26/74

 

Location:

Wyckoff, NJ

 

What is the best thing about your hometown?

The best thing about my town is the proximity to so many great places. I’m only 30 minutes from NYC, an hour or so from upstate NY, an hour or so from a beach, and more.

 

Athletic history:

I was a baseball player, from age 4 until 20. That is all I wanted to do. I ran some cross country and indoor track in high school, simply to stay in shape for baseball. I played every intramural I could growing up, we played pick up sports, went to the park for sand volleyball, everything.

 

Current athletic passion:

I am a runner. In retrospect, instead of being a baseball player that ran when I was growing up, I should have been a runner that also played baseball. I love to compete in races, to be faster and push myself.

 

Who or what in the world is inspiring you right now?

I get a lot of inspiration from my fellow bloggers in the fitness world. Some of the things they are doing is amazing. The focus that a lot of them have is a credit to them. Also, Scott Jones! I have been listening to Scott since his first AOF podcast. I love the connection I have to elites by listening, drawing some knowledge, and some workout/racing tips. Finally, my wife is an inspiration everyday. She is my biggest fan, leading our 4 kids to races, giving me someone to sound off to, and pushing me to do more.

 

What is your favorite single workout or physical challenge that people can try today?

I have two for you. The first, go to the Erin Bersini AOF podcast (#83) and check out her 500 rep workout on the page. It’s awesome, simple, and all you need is a pull up bar and your own body.

My second workout is to take your normal, basic jog distance and make it a progression run. For me, a basic 5 miler becomes a test. After the first mile as a warm up, try to go each mile at 15-20 seconds faster than the last. It’s great for negative split work, running on tired legs, and some mental strength for races. End with a mile cooldown.

 

Why do you consider yourself an athlete on fire?

I consider myself an Athlete On Fire because I like to push myself athletically and I look forward to knowing I am choosing to put in the time and effort needed to accomplish my running/racing goals. In the past, I have been good, not great. I have typically been at a Flame level, with short periods of the Fire level. My challenge for myself for 2017, is to really get after it in my personal, professional, and my running life. I want to be in the Fire, put myself out there.

 

What would you say to someone who hasn’t found their passion in sport or life yet?

It’s never too late. The great thing about the connected way of life we live nowadays, is that you can go online and find a league, a club, a group doing anything. Check out what your friends and family are doing on Facebook, or go to your community webpage. Look for something that sounds fun, nothing else. If you have fun, it will stick. If it feels like work, let it go, you already have one job (at least) right?

 

Where are you on your athletic journey? Flicker, Flame, or Fire?

Flame

 

What keeps you up at night?

Ask my wife, nothing! Once my head hits the pillow I’m out. She says it’s a gift I have! The only thing I want, is for my kids to be happy and healthy!

 

What’s your favorite healthy recipe that anyone can try today?

Since it is cold weather time, here’s a recipe for Pumpkin Oatmeal.

When you get back from your long run, try this out for breakfast. Bonus if you live somewhere cold! Sub in different nuts if you like, a specific maple syrup, or raisins, etc. If you make it, send me a picture(@dailyfitjournal) & I will post it. Enjoy!

Pumpkin & Maple Nut Oatmeal

3/4 C Canned Pumpkin
1/2 TSP Salt
1 1/2 C Rolled Oats
1 TBSP Pumpkin Pie Spice
2 TBSP Pecans, Chopped
2 TBSP Maple Syrup

Combine pumpkin & salt w/3 cups water & boil.
Add oats & Spice.
When mix bubbles, reduce to low heat.
Stir occasionally until oats are cooked/thicken ( 8 min).
Top with nuts and syrup.

362 calories
9G Fat
63G Carbs
11G Fiber

10G Protein

 

NOTE FOR Brian:Thank you so much for sharing part of your story with the Athlete On Fire community. Thanks for being such a loyal follower of Athlete On Fire.  You are inspiring us as much as we are you! You are definitely an inspiring Athlete On Fire!  

Be sure to check out Brian’s blog that covers his journey as an athlete, teacher, and family guy!

 

Remember. I am, you are, everyone is an athlete on fire!

Listen to some inspiring athletes here!

AOF:218 From Mobility WOD HQ, functional training for adaptive athletes.

Max Conserva is back on the show to share a new training protocol he helped develop for coaches and trainers to work better with adaptive athletes.  Before reading anymore be sure to check out the program here. So many trainers simply pass off the opportunity to work with athletes with prosthetics or other obstacles when […]

Read More

AOF:217 Former Olympian finding better ways to deal with injuries with technology.

Ian Warner is a serial entrepreneur, former collegiate and Olympic athlete, and now, a father and husband.  We talk about the idea he has had for year that he finally made happen and the friend he lost that inspires him everyday to keep going.   We talk about failures along the way that give us […]

Read More

AOF: 216 Nike trail runner Chris Mocko.

Chris Mocko is a Boulder, Colorado based runner. We talk about his transition to Colorado from the Bay Area, his favorite trails, his training, and lots about real life stuff.   This episode is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special life insurance rates.  Go to healthiq.com/aof to support the show […]

Read More

AOF:214 Clare Gallagher on coral reefs, travel, running, and her true passions.

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face. She studied coral ecology and ran cross country and track at Princeton. After graduation, she discovered ultra running while teaching English in Northern Thailand. Clare lives in her home state of Colorado when she’s not on the road.   Our conversation went all over into her […]

Read More

Athlete Profiles: 001 Courgette, head stands, cats, and mountain dreams.

Athlete (and we are all athletes) Profiles:

Check out more details about why we do this and even submit your profile HERE.



Name:

Alice

 

DOB:

12/24/88

 

Location:

London, UK

 

What is the best thing about your hometown?

London has the most amazing restaurants – all different cuisines for all different budgets. Plus it’s full of people that all really throw themselves into things, working long hours and running 10 miles through central London to work, everyone being busy and interesting in their own different ways.

 

Athletic history:

I sailed for Great Britain as a junior and did a lot of ballet. Then at 15 I started prioritising my school work and gave up on everything but studying and then eventually studying and drinking with my friends. I started running for the very first time age 23.

 

Current athletic passion:

Ultra running and triathlon – with my first ultramarathon in May next year!

 

Who or what in the world is inspiring you right now?

Pictures of beautiful trails on beautiful mountains just make me want to get out there and run.

 

What is your favorite single workout or physical challenge that people can try today?

I’ve just learnt how to do a headstand and I love it. It is really about core strength and focus on balance. If you can’t do one, give it a try.

 

Why do you consider yourself an athlete on fire?

Because I love it. In just the last few years I have picked up the exercise bug and I genuinely love it all – but especially running. It’s not about how far or fast you go, but whether or not you love it. And I keep telling everyone how brilliant running is and how they should give it a try.

 

What would you say to someone who hasn’t found their passion in sport or life yet?

To keep trying and not to waste time doing stuff they don’t enjoy. If you hate running, that’s fine (I think you’re wrong of course!) but keep trying new things, whether it be exercise-based or art-based or whatever. And if something gives you a bit of a buzz, even if its difficult, keep at it!

 

Where are you on your athletic journey? Flicker, Flame, or Fire?

Flame

 

What keeps you up at night?

My cat licking my face and purring when he decides he wants fed!

 

What’s your favorite healthy recipe that anyone can try today?

Roast veg (whatever you have – but I like sweet potato, butternut squash and carrots) with lentils, chopped up baby tomatoes and lots of parsley. Then topped with courgette dip which is made by shopping up courgettes into a pan, adding in extra virgin olive oil, salt and garlic, and cooking it for 30 mins or so, stirring every few minutes. Its delicious!

 

NOTE FOR ALICE:Thank you so much for sharing part of your story with the Athlete On Fire community. That recipe sounds amazing and the courgette sounds like something new for many athletes! You are definitely an inspiring Athlete On Fire!

 

Remember. I am, you are, everyone is an athlete on fire!

Listen to some inspiring athletes here!

AOF:218 From Mobility WOD HQ, functional training for adaptive athletes.

Max Conserva is back on the show to share a new training protocol he helped develop for coaches and trainers to work better with adaptive athletes.  Before reading anymore be sure to check out the program here. So many trainers simply pass off the opportunity to work with athletes with prosthetics or other obstacles when […]

Read More

AOF:217 Former Olympian finding better ways to deal with injuries with technology.

Ian Warner is a serial entrepreneur, former collegiate and Olympic athlete, and now, a father and husband.  We talk about the idea he has had for year that he finally made happen and the friend he lost that inspires him everyday to keep going.   We talk about failures along the way that give us […]

Read More

AOF: 216 Nike trail runner Chris Mocko.

Chris Mocko is a Boulder, Colorado based runner. We talk about his transition to Colorado from the Bay Area, his favorite trails, his training, and lots about real life stuff.   This episode is sponsored by Health IQ, an insurance company that helps health conscious people get special life insurance rates.  Go to healthiq.com/aof to support the show […]

Read More

AOF:214 Clare Gallagher on coral reefs, travel, running, and her true passions.

Clare Gallagher is an ultrarunner for The North Face. She studied coral ecology and ran cross country and track at Princeton. After graduation, she discovered ultra running while teaching English in Northern Thailand. Clare lives in her home state of Colorado when she’s not on the road.   Our conversation went all over into her […]

Read More

Guys Night:001 3Tread: 3Row: 3Random

When my second kid was born three years ago, I ran out of time.

 

So, I reached out to a few buddies with similar situations and we started working out at 9pm on Tuesday nights. Almost four years later and we are still at it. The workouts are usually pretty tough.  A few of us get competitive and a few of us just get through it.

 

The sweat is always flowing, post beer always cold, and the company always great.

 

I’ll be posting these workouts for you to try.  This one was pretty short and intense to get back at it after 2 months of fairly sedentary living after the passing of my pops.

And for the love of all things good, if you are in Colorado, you gotta join us.  This guy did once last year.


The Workout:  3 SETS (9 minutes/set)

3 minutes on the treadmill at 15% incline and 3.5 mph

3 minutes rowing keeping under 2:10 pace/500m

Then this set in under 3 minutes:

  • 30 feet bear crawl
  • 30 feet crab walk
  • Our weight was 70 lb dumbbell squat press (35lb/hand) Elbows to knees.  10 reps
  • Machine pull downs>> Heaviest you can handle for 10 reps
  • 10 sit ups

 

Note: We did three sets in about 30 minutes.  Light night but felt pretty worked.  We all started at a different station which was decided by the time tested rock….paper…scissors.  1, 2, shoot for the record.

Athlete Profiles

We kind of have this idea.  It is that everyone is an athlete.  We use the podcast to showcase amazing athletes of all levels from all over the world doing amazing things and we want to continue the process here.  How many athletes can we showcase?  We hope 1000’s.

How to be featured?

First of all, being featured isn’t for athletes trying to brag, it is for the readers to gain perspective.  We are all different.  Share a little bit about yourself and it may inspire or give some ideas to others out there.  We are open sourcing what being an athlete look like.

All you have to do is:

  1. Fill out the form below
  2. Send a picture of you doing something you love (posts without pictures are boring) Sent to: athletesonfire (at) gmail (dot) com.

We will get it up in the order we receive.

Do you see anything we missed?  Any questions that would add to the reading experience?  Let us know!

 

Doubling Down: An athlete/entrepreneurs roadmap to truly connecting with people these days.

In late August of 2013, I was driving across Kansas, weary physically and whatever is much worse than weary mentally.  It just hit me.

 

The event my wife Lauren and I started a year ago that had over 2000 people show up in Denver was about to ruin us.  That drive began after the last of 10 events in 10 weeks in 10 cities across the country.

 

Without spending money on marketing, we averaged about 1200 people.  Awesome right?  Well, when we finally dig out of the debt we incurred from this “success” sometime in 2017, at this rate, I’ll share just how awesome those numbers really were.

 

Family lent us money, friends, credit cards did too.  Ouch.  Why wasn’t Lauren in that truck with me?  Oh, she was pregnant with our second son, West.  But I don’t get stressed.  I just push that stuff wayyyyy back.  And I thought on that long drive.

 

  • Did I enjoy this?  NOPE
  • Was it fun?  NOPE (besides some of the adventure or traveling)
  • Was it profitable? Hell NOPE

 

Ok, no more cross country race series.  We are really good at marketing but doing the jobs of 20 people just wasn’t doing it for us.  Companies like Human Movement are really good event producers, we just seem to be  ignorant idea machines at times. But enough about events.

Tons of people, zero connection

 

Here is the biggest takeaway.  We had thousands of people do our event that summer and I knew none of them.  Connected with zero people. It was sad.

 

On that drive across Kansas I decided to start Athlete On Fire.  I would connect with people around the world. Inspire them. Hopefully teach them.  It was in my wheel house and expertise.

 

I also decided to meet new people in person.  Every other week I would find someone new to have coffee or a beer with.  Entrepreneurs, clients, athletes, all of them.  I wanted to connect.  It worked.  I felt better about my work and learned what others were passionate about.

 

I learned about myself and the fact that in such a lonely world, sometimes, we need to get back to the old way of doing things.

 

I mean, who is feeling a little lonely out there?  Maybe not all the time but in a such a “social” world, it does amaze me that feeling lonely is more prevalent than it used to be, or should be. Really, it’s just a theory.   Based on…

  • Gym goers that never look up to make eye contact and never take their headphones out.
  • Travelers that won’t say a simple “hello” or how are you when sitting an inch or two away.
  • Happy going adventurous social media “sharers” that end up hopelessly depressed or worse.

 

I recently laid out how important it is for me to “DOUBLE DOWN” on people.  I came up with most of it when I got back to Colorado that fall. It can happen in person or online.  I’m sharing this because I hope it will help you look at connecting with people differently.

 

NOTE:  Double Down is a gambling term (I don’t often) when you have the opportunity to put twice as much on the table to win twice as much. In this context, you are putting twice the effort into PEOPLE, not cash.

 

Doubling Down On People: An Outline

Online

A. Reach out and get personal– Don’t wait to be invited to send a message or tell someone what they mean to you, even if you don’t know them. It’s powerful.  Kalli, who has helped with this project for over a year did just that.  Many did when my dad passed a couple months ago.  I’ll never forget the gestures.

 

B.  Schedule calls and emails– Meet someone on Twitter you find interesting? Ask for their email, or a call.  I met Justin Kruse because he reached out with some questions about being a coach.  We were on the phone on a Friday night and have since started a project together (more on this later).

 

C.  Ask how to help– Social media and the online world is the “What can you do for me?” universe.  Ask someone how you can help them.  It’s an awesome feeling even if they don’t find ways you can help.

 

D. Follow Up– We have all dropped the ball on this one but it’s important if you want a real relationship.

 

E. Find ways to take it offline– My default is going for a run or hike.  You’ll figure it out.

In Person: Random Encounters with People

 

A. Be open and flexible, engage– I don’t want to talk for a 4 hour flight anymore than you do but you have to say hi when someone sits next to you, every time.  It’s decent people. 

 

Sometimes, it turns into something way cooler.  On a recent flight I gave my aisle seat on a Southwest Flight, the very last aisle or window seat to an older guy (71) I found out.  Dudes, I’m 6’2” 200. Anyway, I walked away with  his stories. His brother was an elite distance runner in the 60’s. He ran a marathon with a buddy on a bet on random roads with no fuel. He was a civil labor attorney and I have his number for any business consulting I need and I had two other contacts he thought would help me. WHAT? I couldn’t buy that type of connection online.  I was open and flexible.  I engaged.

 

B. Make it about them– Just listen.  I have gotten so much better at this because I interview people and make it about them as much as I can.  People love people who listen to them.  People want to be around people that listen to them.

 

C.  Collect experiences– Life is about experiences and I always look for new ones.  Good conversation is an experience and so is getting out of your comfort zone to engage strangers.  Christian Griffith regularly posts about this engagements with strangers.  It’s inspiring for us to see and valuable to experience.  Check out #liveforaliving

 

D. Be approachable–  On the trail, at the store, airport, church, gym,  and wherever.  Be approachable.  Head up.  Headphones out at least some of the time.  Eye contact.  All of it. Be willing to have people approach you and it is so much easier to find connection.  Most of these things are skills I am currently teaching my 5 and 3 year old.  You can do it.  It’s worth it.

And that’s it.  Simple concepts.  It’s in our DNA to connect with other humans and I promise, it will feel good when you do.

 

Let me know if I missed any way to connect. What has been working for you lately?


Scott Jones founded Athlete On Fire so he could connect with more people, more often.  Sharing that part of the project has seemed important lately!  Feel free to connect with him anytime!